A gift of generosity and recovery at State Hospital North for Mental Health Awareness Month

From IDHW’s Todd Hurt, administrator of State Hospital North

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IDHW State Hospital North Director Todd Hurt and NAMI far North President Virginia “Gini” Woodward with new donated Frisbee disc golf baskets on the grounds of State Hospital North.

OROFINO, Idaho – On a beautiful, blue-sky May day, there was a feeling of gratitude flowing through State Hospital North. The first reason for the gratitude was that it had been a long fall, cold winter and wet spring. The second is that patients were able to get out on the grounds during that beautiful day and play Frisbee disc golf. This disc golf was even more special given that we used new disc golf baskets donated to the hospital from NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill) far North.

We have played disc golf for years at the hospital. It’s a great therapy tool that can be used for increasing mood, allowing for exercise, socialization, and joy. Continue reading

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Join us May 11 to raise awareness and erase mental health stigma

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When it comes to mental health, many people confuse feeling bad with being bad. Mental illness is not the result of personal weakness, lack of character or poor upbringing.

Many factors out of one’s control influence whether someone develops a mental health condition: genetics, environment and lifestyle. Being a victim of a crime or having a stressful work or home life can make some people more susceptible.

Yet even though most people with mental illness can be successfully treated and live productive lives, less than half of the adults in the U.S. who need services or treatment get the help that can make a difference.

One reason: Stigma. The isolation, blame, fear and secrecy that is often associated with mental illness can discourage people from reaching out, getting the needed support and getting healthy. Continue reading

Mental health resources are available for Idahoans in flooded and damaged areas

Idaho’s behavioral health officials would like to remind Idahoans that resources are available for those who are feeling overwhelmed by the effects of heavy snowfall and flooding.

Almost half of the counties in Idaho have been issued a state disaster declaration. Flooding is expected to continue and may even worsen in the weeks to come as temperatures increase and cause additional snow melt.

“It’s normal for people of all ages to feel a lot of stress and anxiety after a natural disaster such as a flood,” said Ross Edmunds, administrator of the Division of Behavioral Health in the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. “Natural disasters can have profound effects on people‘s employment, mobility, well-being, relationships, and mental health, especially as they move beyond the flooding and are working on recovering their regular lives, property, and their relationships.” Continue reading