News from DHW: Linda Hatzenbuehler of Pocatello named to Board of Health and Welfare

Linda_Hatzenbuehler

Linda Hatzenbuehler

Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter has appointed Linda Hatzenbuehler of Pocatello, who retired in December 2016 as dean and associate vice president of Idaho State University’s Division of Health Sciences, to a four-year term on the Idaho Board of Health and Welfare.

Hatzenbuehler, chair of the Idaho Council on Suicide Prevention, brings more than 40 years of experience to the Board from across the healthcare spectrum, including professional education and licensure, mental health and clinical psychology. Continue reading

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Teaching healthy relationships helps prevent teenage sexual dating violence

datingviolenceAccording to the 2017 Idaho Youth Risk Behavioral Survey, 21% of female students and 5% of male students in Idaho experienced sexual dating violence in the past 12 months. Sexual dating violence includes kissing, touching, or being physically forced to have sexual intercourse when they did not want to by somebody they were dating or going out with. While every month is an appropriate month to discuss healthy relationships with young people in your life, February is National Teen Dating Violence and Awareness Month. Continue reading

Children’s Dental Health Month: Let’s reduce the 66% of Idaho 3rd graders with bad teeth!

toothbrush-toothpaste-dental-care-clean-40798February is National Children’s Dental Health Month, so it’s a good time to remind everyone – adults and children alike – that your oral health is important to your overall health. Practicing good oral health habits such as daily brushing and flossing and regular dental visits are easy steps toward keeping teeth and gums healthy at every age. Continue reading

RSV and whooping cough on the rise in Idaho – protect your baby

BabyForWhoopingCough

We are seeing high numbers of cases in Idaho of a couple of diseases that are serious and even deadly for babies. Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, and pertussis, commonly called whooping cough, are not likely to cause serious health issues for otherwise healthy adults, but it’s still very important for everyone to take precautions against both. Continue reading

Go Red: Heart disease is the #1 killer of women in the U.S.; know your risk!

Go-Red-for-Women

National Wear Red Day, or “Go Red for Women,” is this Friday, Feb. 2, so now is a good time to talk about heart health, specifically as it applies to women. Nationally, heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined, and in Idaho it is the second leading cause of death for women, after cancer. In fact, cardiovascular disease in the U.S. kills approximately one woman every 80 seconds. Continue reading

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month – Regular screening is key!

 

CervicalAwareness_EarlyDetectionAll women, especially those over the age of 30, are at risk for developing cervical cancer, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say it’s also the easiest gynecologic cancer to prevent, with regular screening. Getting screened regularly for cervical cancer is important because that is the most effective way to find the disease early. It is highly treatable when it is found early enough. Unfortunately, Idaho has the lowest rate for cervical screening in the United States. Continue reading

Washing hands often can ward off norovirus, the ‘Winter Vomiting Bug’

how-get-norovirus-lgYou may have seen in the news last month that more than 500 people fell ill to norovirus on two separate cruise ships, bringing to 12 the number of major outbreaks of this nasty virus aboard ocean-liners in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control. That may lead you to think that norovirus is something you only risk on a cruise ship. But there’s actually a better chance you’ll be infected in restaurants, long-term care facilities like nursing homes and in other places where people gather and share bathrooms – day cares, schools, camps, and big events. Norovirus is also known as the “winter vomiting bug,” so it’s a good time to talk about reducing your risk. Continue reading