Make this a healthy and safe summer in Idaho with these tips and resources

Summer Safety

Despite the fits and starts of sun and showers, spring has arrived in Idaho. Memorial Day weekend marks the unofficial start of the summer season; increased time outdoors can come with some risk. From biking and camping to picnicking and swimming – all of these outdoor activities may present risks that are avoidable. Here’s our annual list of tips to make this a healthy and safe Idaho summer: Continue reading

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Memorial Day Weekend is the start of summer – let’s make it a safe one this year

DworshakCampIdaho experienced one of the harshest winters on record and this spring has been unseasonably soggy, but Memorial Day weekend has finally arrived as the unofficial start to the summer season. As you get ready to hit the road, pack coolers for picnics and camping trips, and enjoy the sun, water and great outdoors, here are some health and safety reminders so you and your family have an enjoyable summer.  Continue reading

Memorial Day weekend means summer is here! (Yay!) Will you be safe?

As we get ready to hit the road, pack our coolers for picnics and camping trips and generally get ready for the official start to the summer (finally!), we hope you’ll take the time to brush up on some health and safety tips so you and your families have a fun and rewarding summer.

Be safe on roads and highways: Every hour, an average of two traffic accidents happen somewhere in our state, with too many resulting in fatalities. Aggressive driving contributes to almost half of all motor vehicle deaths. From Memorial Day throughout the summer, more vehicles will be traveling Idaho roads, so be patient and don’t take foolish chances to arrive a few minutes early. Other travel safety tips include:

  • Be sure your vehicle is ready for travel. Check the tire air pressure (including the spare tire), along with belts, fluids, and lighting.
  • Don’t overload your vehicle.
  • Make sure everyone in your car is wearing a seatbelt.
  • Don’t text or talk on a cellphone while you’re driving. Don’t become distracted trying to do other things as you drive. A car traveling at 65 mph covers 95 feet per second. A one-second distraction could result in a serious accident and injuries.
  • Be aware of symptoms of fatigue or “highway hypnosis.” Take a break if you feel drowsy.
  • Take your time and be patient; it’s better to get there in one piece. Allow ample space between your vehicle and others on the road and pay attention to the speed limits and other traffic signs.
  • Don’t drink alcohol and drive.
  • Don’t leave your child or your pet unattended in the car, even for just a few minutes. It can heat up quickly to dangerous temperatures.

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