Heat-related illness prevention: Stay cool as summer gets hot

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We’ve already seen triple-digit high temperatures in portions of Idaho this summer and mid-July and August are traditionally the warmest months, so it’s a good time to remember how to avoid heat-related illness. Heat-related illnesses and deaths are preventable, and it’s important for us all to keep as cool as possible so we can stay healthy. Continue reading

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Idaho’s obesity rates improve slightly

Idaho adults may not be able to tighten their belts a full notch, but they are moving their waistline measurements in the right direction, according to new data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For 2015, 28.6 percent of Idaho adults reported they were obese, which is down slightly from 28.9 percent in 2014. This ranks Idaho with the 19th lowest rate of adult obesity in the nation, and makes the state one of 25 that saw an improvement in 2015.

“We are very happy to see Idaho adults reversing the decades-long increase in obesity in our state, which tripled over the last 25 years,” said Ivie Smart, program manager for Physical Health and Nutrition in the Department of Health and Welfare. “Obesity increases our risk for heart disease, diabetes, stroke, certain cancers, and results in overall lower quality of life. Eating healthy and being active can reverse that, which an increasing number of Idahoans are embracing.”

Idaho’s obesity rate in 1990 was 9.3 percent, and steadily increased to a peak of 29.6 percent in 2013.  Continue reading

New report shows increase in number of obese Idaho adults

Idaho has a weight problem.

That’s surprising in a state that prides itself on its culture of outdoor activities and recreation, but newly released data on health risks for Idaho adults shows a continued increasing trend in people who are obese or overweight. The Idaho Behavioral Risk Factors, 2013 report shows 29.6 percent of Idaho adults reported being obese, while 64.9 percent said they were overweight. In 2012, 26.8 percent of adults surveyed reported they were obese, with 62.5 percent being overweight.

“Being overweight or obese can cause or worsen serious chronic health conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke,” says Angie Gribble, public health program manager for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN). “We all need to work together to turn this trend around because those extra pounds can lead to poor health and premature death.”  Continue reading