COVID-19 Q&A: Out-of-state residents, symptoms of COVID-19, flu, and UVC lamps

Why don’t the state or local health districts count out-of-state residents who test positive for COVID-19 in Idaho?

Public health departments at the state and local levels often don’t receive test results for out-of-state residents. The lab that performs the test sends the result to the address given by the person tested. If test results are received in Idaho and it is determined that person isn’t a resident of Idaho, the results are sent to that person’s state of residence for investigation and follow-up. This is common and consistent public health practice throughout the United States – public health authority to have personal health information applies to residents in their states.

However, DHW staff are working with universities to see if and how we can get summary information on their student populations, many of whom may list an out of state legal residence when they are tested.

Do asymptomatic carriers of the virus that causes COVID-19 have a fever or increased temperature?

No – since they are asymptomatic, that would mean they are not experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, which would include a fever. However, some people who are asymptomatic initially may develop symptoms the following day, or a few days later.

The symptoms of COVID-19 can vary from none at all to very severe. This is why following the recommended guidelines – and especially wearing a face covering in public, maintaining 6-feet of physical distance, and staying home if you feel sick — is so important. It’s possible to spread the disease without knowing it.

Continue reading “COVID-19 Q&A: Out-of-state residents, symptoms of COVID-19, flu, and UVC lamps”

Idaho COVID-19: ‘We expect there to be bumps and blips in the data’

From very early in the COVID-19 outbreak, Gov. Brad Little and Department of Health and Welfare (DHW) Director Dave Jeppesen have attributed the decisions they are making about how to respond to the pandemic in Idaho to the latest scientific evidence available.

That scientific evidence is provided through the expertise of the public health staff at the department and at the local public health districts, but also largely from the data being generated from the outbreak and posted at https://coronavirus.idaho.gov/.

Epidemiologic data are collected from multiple sources, including people, clinics, labs, and hospitals. The completeness and timeliness of the information can vary drastically, depending on how the data are reported and who is reporting it.

Although Idaho is ahead of a lot of other states in our ability to accept electronic data from laboratories and clinical partners, it is not unusual for those records to have missing information. Data received from clinical and laboratory partners are considered preliminary. Information is verified during case investigations, which are often conducted over several days by epidemiologists, and information is gathered from healthcare providers and patients to complete the investigation. Continue reading “Idaho COVID-19: ‘We expect there to be bumps and blips in the data’”