Rollout of new food stamps schedule was uneventful

Idaho’s  transition to a 10-day schedule for the distribution of food stamps benefits was smooth, with minimal issues being reported  for the 180,000 citizens enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

Food stamp recipients, grocery stores and food pantries proved to be informed and prepared for the change, which took place from July 1-10.

“Based on what has happened in other states, this had the potential to be an extremely difficult transition,” said Welfare Administrator Lori Wolff. “But there were very few issues, thanks to the collaboration and efforts of all of our partners in feeding Idahoans who need help to put food on their tables. Most of the calls we received were from people who knew but had forgotten about the change. We were able to help them get the information and resources they needed until their benefits were available.” Continue reading

Change is coming in less than 2 months for food stamps recipients in Idaho

Starting July 1, food stamps benefits will be delivered on a different schedule. They will be delivered over the first 10 days of the month, instead of only on the first of the month. It’s very important that everyone involved understands how they may be affected so they can plan ahead and avoid a food shortage as much as possible. Participants who do not receive their benefits on the first of the month will need to have a plan for how they will address the extra days until their benefits are available.

Why is the schedule being changed?

The Legislature passed a law in 2014 to require the department to issue benefits over the first 10 days of the month rather than only on the first day of the month. Grocers had lobbied the Legislature to move to a 10-day distribution for benefits because of crowded stores, long lines and challenges with inventory on the first of each month. The department has been working with grocery stores, food banks and pantries, and others since July 2015 to make this transition as seamless as possible. Continue reading