Director Armstrong to present PCAP proposal to H&W committees

Department of Health and Welfare Director Richard Armstrong will present the proposal for the Primary Care Access Program to the Senate Health and Welfare Committee this afternoon in room WW54 of the Statehouse. The meeting starts at 3 p.m., and Armstrong is expected to give his presentation at about 3:30.

He’ll also present the proposal to the House Health and Welfare Committee at 9 a.m. Wednesday in room EW20.

See his presentation slides here.

 

 

Opinion: PCAP could be a great start toward keeping more Idahoans healthy

By Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter

I’ve read and watched with interest in recent days as legislators, healthcare providers, community leaders, columnists, editorial boards and citizens have reacted to the Primary Care Access Plan that I unveiled January 7th.

Responses have run the gamut from “It’s not enough – just expand Medicaid” to “We shouldn’t do anything but focus on repealing Obamacare.”

Despite what seems to be an immutable impasse, it certainly is a conversation worth having, and I’m glad we are having it. But critics seem to be missing the point of the proposal that Director Dick Armstrong and his team at the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare crafted specifically for Idaho. The fact is that the PCAP option – or something very much like it – is all that we can reasonably hope to achieve right now in the context of Idaho’s political environment.  Continue reading

Gov. Otter unveils proposal for establishing a primary care access program

Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter announced a new proposal today to connect uninsured Idaho adults living in poverty with primary healthcare and preventive services to help keep them healthy.

Subject to approval by the Legislature, the Primary Care Access Program (PCAP) is a public-private partnership that would benefit adults 19-64 years of age who have no access to health insurance coverage.

PCAP providers would assess the health of each participant and develop treatment plans to manage chronic conditions and coordinate their care through a patient-centered medical home model.

“This is an all-Idaho initiative that can improve the health and lives of 78,000 adults who have been going without basic healthcare and suffering because of it,” Gov. Otter said. “We have been struggling to find a solution for more than three years, and it has become apparent Medicaid expansion is not what Idaho wants. This is an achievable alternative that gives us total control, with no federal strings or mandates.” Continue reading